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and current economics professor at the university of california at berkeley. good to see you. thanks so much for joining us. >> how are you? >> let's talk about these numbers on friday, the surprisingly strong jobs numbers. 146,000 new jobs created. the unemployment rate dropping to 7.7%. we were expecting some impact from the super storm sandy in earlier thanksgiving. what do the numbers say about the economy? >> apparently we are still struggling. these are not hugely wonderful numbers but undoubtedly we're moving in the right direction. the early thanksgiving may have canceled out negative effects of sandy. sandy really did not have much of an effect in november. >> interesting -- do you think we'll see revisions next month? >> we probably will. every month we're seeing revisions and so far they have been downward. the revisions we saw friday for october and september, were both downward slightly. i wouldn't be surprised if we see downward revisions coming up. >>> the other big story we're talking about is the fiscal cliff. can you help us read the tea leaves. we heard from timothy geithn
or minimize taxes to hit some people. high tax residents new york, california may find some of the deductibility of taxes is restricted. all of that is going to have a negative impact on consumption. we have seen the third quarter show that consumption increase is slower than expected. that's going to get accentuated as we go into the new year, which is why i think even if there is an agreement the impact is going to be quite negative. >> jim, you disagree. you call it a mole hill. what do you mean? >> i think it's sold as a cliff as if we're going to fall entirely off and have this massive fiscal tightening next year. what is more likely is a modest tax hike and spending cuts and most things extended and we live to fight for another day. i personally think we will have fiscal cliffs over and over the next several years. if you have a modest fiscal tightening next year, it's nothing new for the economy. we have had 1% for every year of the recovery. the deficit has improved by about 3.5% in the first 3 1/2 years of the recovery. so a little more modest fiscal tightening hasn
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